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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 507 (some duplicates have been removed)
that birth rights dramatically changed from the better and the provision is unique to the united states. this is a half hour. thanks to both of you for joining us. you will be talking about at this conference about birth right citizenship. set the stage for us in what is birth right citizenship. >> in a nut shell, this is the principal that any person born in the united states regardless of the status of their parents and theiran set offers and race and gender and religion and any other category is a citizen of the united states by virtue of being born here. you can become a citizen if you are an immigrant. the important point is this was not a principal that goes to the constitution. in the civil rights act of 1866. the first clause of the 14th amendment said any person born in the united states with or two minor exceptions were thought to be citizens of their own sovereignties, but any person born in the united states is a citizen. this was not necessarily the case of the civil war, the most dramatic example was dread scott in which the supreme court stated that no black person could
ended in 2009 but most did not feel it but people in all three states feel the united states should get out of afghanistan by a 2-1 margin. but most approve of the job that obama is doing there. a gender gap is on display. it is too close to call in florida where the president is down but it is 13 points in ohio. and he has a 17-point edge among women in pennsylvania. >>reporter: thank you on the perfect strange day in washington, dc. another former aide to john edwards on the witness stand today. he said he overher the foam presidential candidate asking his mistress whether her baby bump was showing. the foam aide here in the blue tie and glasses said in 26 fix he saw the mistress get off the elevator on the same floor as john edwards and the foam aide says the mistress told him she and john edwards were madly if love. and the next day the aide says john edwards called him to deny he was having an affair and told him rielle hunter was crazy. not long after that run in the aide said campaign staffers had to stay in a different hotel floor from the presidential candidate, but one day in
and that the provision is unique to the united states. this is half an hour. >>> american history tv is in milwaukee at the organization of american historians annual meeting and we're joined by professor eric foner from columbia university and linda kerber with the university of iowa. thanks to both of you for joining us. you'll be talking about at this conference about birthright citizenship and the 14th amendment. why don't you set the stage for us, mr. foner, and what is birthright citizenship? >> well, in a nutshell, this is the principle that any person born in the united states, regardless of the status of their parents, their ancestors, regardless of their race, gender, religion, any other category, is a citizen of the united states just by the virtue of being boerch here. of course you can also become a citizen by naturalization if you're an immigrant. but the important point is this was not a principle that goes all the way back to the institution constitution. it was really implemented or institutionalized in the aftermath of the civil war and the 14th amendment which wrote it into the co
to place it in a larger perspective, and that is by non-indians who want equality in the united states, wrapping themselves in the flag, and native peoples were here first, and survival, the fact that they have survived as separate cultures uniquely on the planet as american indians is, to me, the most noteworthy. they have not melded into the mainstream. by and large, tribes are still operating. some are in better shape than others, some are larger, some are smaller. some have suffered more, some have suffered slightly less, but they are still here, and if i wanted to change one thing, i would like the mainstream of america to realize that american indians, as tribes and tribal people, are still here, still a vibrant part of the economy, a part of the culture, a part of the arts, literature, music, this is, after all, oklahoma is, after all, an american indian state at its start, and american indians have not disappeared or vanished into the mainstream with dinosaurs, as some people are prone to ask me sometimes. >>> find out where skrchlt span's local content vehicles are going next
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
second term as president of the united states. [cheers and applause] [chanting] >> now, governor romney is a patriotic american. he has raised a wonderful family, and he has much to be proud of. he runs a large financial firm, but i think he has learned the wrong lessons from these experiences. he sincerely believes that ceos and wealthy investors like him make money, the rest of us will automatically prosper well. when a woman in iowa shares the story of her financial struggles he responded with financial theory. he said hour productivity equals our income. let me tell you something, virginia, the problem with our economy is not that the american people aren't productive enough. you've never worked harder in your lives. you're working harder than ever. the challenge we face right now--the challenge we faced for over a decade is harder work and higher incomes. it's bigger profits have not led to better jobs. governor romney does not seem to get that. he doesn't seem to understand that maximizing profits by whatever means necessary, whether it's your layoffs, joys sourcing, union
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
can win an academy award someday and the guy behind you can be a future president of the united states or even better than that the mayor of new york city the guy in front of you could be a future nobel laureate not to your right but certainly the one to your left. it's even worse than it looks in which they argue that washington partisanship has caused congress to become dysfunctional. we talked to the authors on wednesday washington journal. this is just under an hour. >> the gentleman that for a book are taking a look at congress it's even worse than that looks how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism. joining us, the author norman and co-author resident scholar of the american enterprise institute thomas mann of the brookings institution where he served studies senior fellow. gentlemen, thanks for joining us. >> happy to be with you. >> the question is if it is worse than it looks, what exactly is worse? >> guest: we are now in a situation which we have a fundamental mismatch between our political parties which would become intensely polari
to -- to the 209,145 soldiers and officers that were officially mustered into the bureau of the united states troops. attention was brought to how these soldiers were organized, how they fought, and what they accomplished in the civil war. attention was brought to an african descent community that fought to save the union and free themselves by enforcing the emancipation proclamation. attention was brought to -- to an organized community that planned for and executed that plan to end the tyranny of slavery and lead with the constitution and to gain the rights of citizens in league with the constitution, attention was brought to one of the best kept secrets in american history. now if the overt story of the soldiers and sailors, guides, scouts, spies, nurses, was -- was one of the best kept secrets in american history. then the covert story is a secret within a secret. within the best kept secret. and when we talk about women in the civil war, african descent women in the civil war that is another layer of one of those best kept secrets in american history. one of those untold stories. tonight
station. he said three sthings, two of them were, it is very clear to the world that the united states has lost and that's why the united states as everyone knows, the united states is begging the taliban to come -- just sit down and negotiate with us. please. we know you've murdered thousands of americans. we get that. that's ok. just sit down with us. we'll keep releasing you murdering thugs if you just agree to sit down with us and talk. we'll even buy you a wonderful office in qatar so you will have international international prestige to spread whatever goodwill you wish to spread. that would be known, mr. speaker , the president would pay attention, that would be known as radical jihad. that is what they wish to spread. here's a news report today from foxnews.com from kabul, the u.s. has been secretly releasing captured taliban fighters from a detention center in afghanistan in a bid to strengthen its hand in peace talks with the insurgent group, the "washington post" reported monday. who in the world has ever studied history comes around and says we are releasing the murdering thugi
will require an east coast site. this is all about geometry. everyone who lives in the united states understands if the east coast is a threat from iran they don't want to wait for a missile to come from the district all way across the united states to try to respond to the threat. they want somebody to be there quicker, to have an opportunity to respond. aural of our open source intelligence indicates iran can have capability by 2015. the language that we have in the bill with the preparation for the site to meet the threat of 2015. i don't think anybody wants to gamble on the united states security by saying that our adversaries who clearly stated the intention of ibm technology for the purposes of reaching mainland united states are going to be so slow that we can just wait. we can't wait. you cannot just flick a switch and have a missile defense field. we all know there's apparently a secret deal with the russian where is the president believes he'll have greater flexibility. perhaps there are members on the other side to support the side with the president. i think most of us on
, and he said that the united states wanted to be a tremendous partner and cheerleader of the development of brazil's offshore industry. now, mr. president, i have to tell you that was like rubbing salt in the wound of tens of thousands of oil field workers and others who are suffering because of the obama administration policy here in this country really discouraging energy development. the way president obama proposed to be a strong supporter and partner and cheerleader of brazilian offshore development was through an ex-im bank loan and there are many of these sorts of loans. again, in august, 2009, talking about brazil, the case i mentioned, "the wall street journal" reported an editorial that -- quote -- "the u.s. is going to lend billions of dollars to brazil's state-owned oil company, petrobrass to finance exploration of the huge offshore delivery in brazil's oil field near rio de janeiro" -- close quote. again the ex-im bank provided a $2 billion loan to aid brazilian oil production and that's what president obama was cheering and encouraging and making happen. it's happened other
this to say. >> i do not comment on specific classified operations other than to say that the united states engages in a number of operations to go after al qaeda and their militant allies. their terrorist allies who would try to attack the united states. what this incident makes clear is that this country has to continue to remain vigilant against those that would seek to attack this country. >> we'll have the latest on this story at the top of the show. plus, debating gay marriage. it was a great case of tell me what you really think. yesterday vice president joe biden came out in favor of same-sex marriage. it's assumed he was speaking for himself, not for the president. opposing gay marriage is no longer a slam dunk for republicans. americans' attitude towards gays and gay marriage are changing incredibly fast. but, how biden's from the heart declaration will affect the election is anyone's guess. also, president obama kicked off his re-election campaign this wct weekend by rejecting the question, are you better off than you were four years ago? he said the right question is, where are
. this is really all about geometry. because i think everybody who lives in the united states understands that if the east coast is at threat from iran, they don't want to wait for a missile to come from mr. garamendi's district all the way across the united states to try to respond to that threat. they want something that is going to be there quicker, that is going to have an opportunity to respond. all of our open source intelligence indicates that iran could have the capability by 2015, ergo, the language that we have in the bill that has the precipitation for this site to meet the threat of 2015. i don't think anybody wants to gamble the united states' security by saying that our adversaries who have stated the intention of having icbm technology for the purposes of reaching mainland united states are going to be so slow that we can just wait. we can't wait. this has a rolling time period within which to get done. you cannot just flick a switch and have a missile defense field. we need to get started. now, the president of the united states has a different view. we all know from his l
the united states is trying to see whether the device could have been detected by the full body scanners that are now deployed in many airlines, many airports for flights that are bound to the u.s. now they say they can't be certain but they suspect it's built by al qaeda's and yemen's master bombmaker, the same man who designed the underwear bomb, and also the bombs that were hidden in printer card ridge, toner cartridges that were sent on cargo planes, intercepted on flights that were destined for chicago. so it's described as a great success, chris, for intelligence, and a further sign that al qaeda in yemen still the number one plot -- number one threat to the u.s. >> let me go to andrea mitchell for the political context. if you were to blow up an airliner, flying from yemen, to the united states, filled with people from yemen, people from our side working with them, what would be the fire power politically of blowing up a plane in that route? >> well, certainly that would be -- >> okay i'm gone. >> -- a huge political explosion, as well. let me give you a few more details. as you j
for the economy of the united states. i have been a supporter of the export-import bank since i arrived in congress in 1977. simply put, the ex-im bank supports the sales of american-made products overseas when private finances is not available. -- financing is not available. according to the ex-im bank's 2011 annual report, the bank supported $32.7 billion in exports last year, over 288,000 american jobs. many of these jobs are in the pacific northwest and in my congressional district. i ask unanimous consent to put -- and add additional information. the important point srk let's vote for this bill. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman from california. mr. miller: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the distinguish mad jort leader, the gentleman from virginia, mr. cantor. the chair: the gentleman from virginia is recognized for one minute. mr. cantor: i thank the speaker and i thank the gentleman from california. mr. speaker, i rise today to speak in favor of h.r. 2072, securing american jobs through export act of 2011. make no mistake, i am no fan of government sub
the challenges with less risk of damage to the economies of the rest of the world and the united states. >> if breeze is forced out of the euro before they get to this wonderful package of slower austerity and more growth? is forced out of the euro? >> europe as a whole has a very strong incentive in doing what it's gone to take to make monetary union work. that's what the reforms over the last six months have tried to do. they tried to put in place a set of mechanisms for discipline in fiscal policy and cooperating on fiscal policy, for sharing as of resources, for managing the financial system that need to make monetary union work. i think their decisions, confronted with this fear of broad erosion in your experiment, is to redouble their commitment to try to make this thing work. if we believe they have the ability to do that. we hope they manage this process. very difficult set of intelligence. >> to learn anything from their experience or is it totally different? >> the talent is are different, but if you listen to where we started this conversation, what we're trying to do is make
150 years ago. the 37th congress of the united states was arguably the most productive, the most creative, the most farseeing and the most consequenceal in american history. don't take my word for it. here's john nicolai, the grouchy gatekeeper of lincoln's presidential office. the secretary whose job it was to say no on behalf of the busiest man in the world and, boy, was he ever good at it. people called him irascible. that was the only one of the names that i can repeat in -- on c-span. when congress adjourned in mid july after about 7 1/2 months in session, having wrenched american history from the dead end of slavery toward the hard, slow course of freedom, having created our modern monetary and fiscal machinery, having established the united states as a world class military and naval power, having opened the frontier to homesteading settle lers and supported their toil through a bureau -- federal bureau of agriculture. having authorized a rail length from the atlantic to the pacific across the same daunting mountain pass that doomed the donner party, and perhaps most vision
the stewardship program but to the forest industry as a whole. on my own land in the southeastern united states i have seen direct benefit of the forest stewardship program. my work with the long leaf pine restoration has been in part a product of the stewardship program. to date i have restored more than 700 acres of long leaf pine in an effort to restore this native tree to our forest. second, the forest legacy program has been an important part of conservation detective work by allowing land owners to help protect environmentally important forest areas from expansion and by engaging with the locally led process to develop conservation plans. while the senate 2012 farm bill framework now includes a program cap of $200 million annually, i do not believe this cap will be a negative impact on being able to successfully carry out responsible conservation. insects continue to be wreak direct havoc on our forest. insect infestation and disease have a direct impact on our members and furthermore put their livelihood? danger due to the loss of timber and the increased risk of wildfire. conservation dis
of the united states. what was remarkable is what mitt romney didn't say. he didn't explain a single thing that he learned as the leader of bain capital that would translate into being president of the united states. i think that was the problem. up with specific thing he did say that we could really learn from is he talked about one company that bain capital did invest in, which is a company that bain capital invested $18 million in. maybe he learned that government helps create jobs twice as much as private equity. >> what was your reaction? >> i thought it was really weird. it seemed like our decision was no decision at all. you just said i don't know. that is what we are seeing over several days. this was an interview that was by no means a hard ball set of questions but basic questions like tell us what you did and is this what you need to know? i have learned a lot in my entire life. it made it sound like he had more to hide than he has to hide. >> he started attacking the president. it was as if the interview was with a surrogate of the president as opposed to the candidate himself.
't dream. my mother believed and my father believed that if i wanted to be president of the united states, i could be. i could be vice president. my mother and father and believed that if my brother and sister wanted to be a millionaire, they could be a millionaire. my mother and father dreamed as much as any rich guy dreams. >> absolutely. >> any don't get it! they don't get who we are. >> good morning. it's thursday, may 17th. >> who was that? >> that was the vice president of the united states. >> i don't get it. >> what do you mean you don't get it? >> i don't get who they are. i'm joking. of course, i get who joe is. >> i get who joe is. >> i am joe. joe is me. >> yes, you are. >> all right. >> you're confused. >> i'm back we have. we have jim cramer on the set running into 30 rock this morning scurrying around in circles going where is the "wall street journal." he looked like he needed a fix. >> mike, you hung out with baseball on us last night. >> baseball owners and bob bowman and who we were talking about who created and developed mlb-tv, which is just spectacular. >> spectacula
. garamendi's district all the way across the united states to try to respond to that threat. they want somebody who will be there quicker and have the opportunity to respond. all are open-source intelligence -- all our open-source intelligence indicates that iran could have nuclear capability by 2015. i do not think anyone wants to gamble by saying that our adverse eight years -- our adversaries are going to be so slow that we can just wait. we cannot wait. this has a rolling time period in which to get done. you cannot just flick a s witch. we know there is a secret deal with the russians were the president believes he will have greater flexibility after the election -- where the president believes he will have greater flexibility after the election. i think most of us on the committee, a majority, believe that we should not be responding to a secret deal with the russians, but responding to the real needs that we have for national security. we need to do missile defense whether this president wants to or not. when you look at the emerging threats, the open source intelligence, it oft
on one thing. when you leave the east coast of the united states, you can drive for miles from state to state and not see another black face. call to montana, utah, parts of oregon and washington -- there are lots of african americans in this country but there are parts where there are none. on the broader issue, that is certainly true. the president has done a lot for not just african americans but for everyone in the country. the health-care bill, the stimulus package. we were losing 800,000 jobs a month. the shift has been helpful for everyone. you cannot count on the all.dent to do with allit you have to start a small business and take the risk of willing to fail. there are conditions that exist, but government cannot solve all those problems. they have to be solved at the committee level. host: teresa is a republican from trenton, new jersey. caller: hi. i was listening -- i really love you. you're a great democratic strategist and i love your opinions and have you correct other people and bring them back to what the heart of the problem is. thank you for that. in order for us t
on the birth of the united states." professor wood is interviewed by national review's senior editor richard brookhiser. the new york historical society hosted this hour-long event. for coming out on this grim night. but you had a great incentive which is to hear gordon wood. i'm going to begin by paying you, gordon, a round-about compliment. it's a little late, but a nice one. i had dinner with newt gingrich in 1994. and he had -- he had just become speaker elect. the republicans had just captured the house in the '94 election for the first time in 40 years. and at the dinner he talked -- the talk turned to what i was doing. i knew what he was doing. i said i was writing a book on george washington. and without hesitation, he said you have to read "the radicalism of the american revolution" by gordon wood. so we all have our opinions on newt and sometimes he's with the public and sometimes he's not, but there he was entirely with the public. this is -- this is a provocative, interesting, delightful book so i want to get right to it. i want to start with my favorite sentence. my favorite sen
other have worked together back in the 1990's?" maybe this is a complement to the united states. guest: cooperation between two countries is good. mill to mill relationships which we have lots of countries including countries that are not our closest friends, we used to have these relationships with pakistan and we stopped at our peril in our relationship with pakistan and that has declined as you are well aware relationships, especially like economic dialogue like hillary clinton and secretary of the treasury tim geithner had in beijing are very good things. what we should watch and a dangerous time his cooperative relationships where we will have competition like china and russia. that is what we should try to achieve. if we were doing and in the late 1990's, that is a good thing. host: this question is from twitter - guest: first of all, i don't call it the arabis spring. -- the arab spring. i called the arab awakening. the organizing events is the birth of the arab citizen. think about that. citizens of mellon fell other officials have not done well in egypt yes. it is an important
studies supported medical use of marijuana for treatment in the united states and no animal or human data supports the safety of marijuana for general medical use, end of quote. as required by the controlled substance act, the d.e.a. required a scientific and medical valuation and scheduling recommendation. and i quote, that marijuana, the stuff we are saying tonight -- anybody -- and you saw the "60-minute" piece, they come in, buy, they take. we are talking about doctors, the number of doctors ripping off people with objectiony continuin. the number of -- oxycotin. and go down to broward county in florida and go into the pain clinics. there are buses and planes coming down to buy it and doctors are writing prescriptions. so we are going to hide behind it? the number of doctors that ruin young people on oxycotin whereby they died, they died, the doctor says it's ok, but health and human services said, quote, marijuana has a high potential for abuse. has no accepted no medical use in the united states and lacks an acceptable level of safety. i think if this amendment passes and this becom
, and it was the right thing to do. >> the president of the united states today chose an interview with robin roberts to make news and to make history. >> over the course of several years as i talked to friends and family and neighbors, when i think about members of my own staff who are incredibly committed, monogamous relationships, same-sex relationships, raising kids together, when i think about those soldiers or airmen or marines or sailors who are out there fighting on my behalf, and yet feel constrainted, even now that don't ask, don't tell is gone, because they are not able to commit themselves in a marriage, at a certain point i just concluded that for me personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. >> white house officials are leaking a background story that sounds like the stuff of fiction and just may be. as the story goes, the president planned to announce his support for marriage equality sometime before the democratic national convention in september, but then vice president biden said this on "meet the press." >>
dissident who says he wants to seek asylum in the united states. the administration says chen ga gaunchung left at his request. >> michele bachmann and rick santorum finally make peace with governor romney? new poll numbers tell a is your rising truth about the republican right. >>> fast moving developments surrounding chinese human rights activist, chen guangcheng. he has been pleading for help and asking to come to the united states with the family. he left the safe haven of the u.s. embassy on monday but says officials misled him. he had a congressional hearing and described the conditions at his home. >> translator: i really am afraid for my other family members' life. they have installed seven video cameras. even with the electric fence. >> among those watching closely, president obama's campaign opponent, mitt romney. >> the reports are, if they are accurate, that our administration, willingly or unwittingly, communicated would chen an implicit threat to his family and probably or may have sped up the process of his decision to leave the embassy. if these reports are true, this is a
. >> meanwhile, the chinese government demand an apology from the united states. the foreign minister said: in the meantime, security was tight outside the hospital where chen is being treated, and the hospital's name was quickly banned as a search term on the chinese internet. we take a closer look now at this still unfolding story with shao chung, director of the berkeley-china internet project at u.c. berkeley, and editor of the "china digital times," an online publication. and evan osnos, who's written on chen guangcheng and other dissidents as the china correspondent for the "new yorker" magazine. he joins us tonight from the campus of stanford university. os, i'll start with you. what do you make of this very confusing series of events today? is there any way to unravel what's known at this point? >> well, it's been an extraordinary 24 hours. the story is very dynamic. a few hours ago, frankly, all of us thought that the u.s. government, the chinese side, had reached perhaps the best available solution given the moment, which was to create an opportunity for chen guangcheng to get o
is recognized for five minutes. mr. fattah: the congress of the united states in a bipartisan vote passed the energy independence and security act of 2007. it was signed into law by president bush. it just suggests that in federal procurement when we seek an energy that the department should use, energy efficient sources, so that we don't rely on unnecessary middle eastern supplies for oil, this removes this requirement. so i hope we would vote against it. this has been a part of the law for a number of years now and has helped save taxpayers money. so i would ask for a no vote on the amendment. the speaker pro tempore: does the gentleman yield back? -- the chair: does the gentleman yield back? mr. fattah: i'd be glad to yield. mr. dicks: this is an effort to overturn a law that was passed in 2007 that says -- try to do the most energy efficient approach to running the government. i mean, i think -- mr. flores: if the gentleman will yield? mr. dicks: i think it's common sense and i urge a no vote on the amendment. the chair: does the gentleman yield his time? mr. fattah: i'd be glad to yi
party's political ideology. it is the responsibility to the congress to ensure that the united states of america pays its bills, that it maintains its credit worthiness, that it fulfills its obligation and maintains the full faith in credit that it has long enjoyed. >> the comments of jay carney earlier today. the headline from the washington times, sparks fly at a white house meeting. joining us live on the phone is susan crabtree who posted the story a short while ago. thank you for being with us. >> thanks for having me. >> we have the he said she said statements from the speaker of the house, john boehner, reaction from nancy pelosi saying the speaker's characterization of the meeting wasn't quite right. as you indicated and others indicated some rather tense words, if you want to say tense, between the president and the speaker on the debt limit vote. what have you been able to glean from the session? because nobody spoke on the record after the session. >> it seemed like the white house portrayed it in a friendly light when jay carney came out for comments saying it was a friend
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 507 (some duplicates have been removed)